Our Process

The tequila process details what goes into the making of 3 Amigos Tequila. Producing tequila is not hard, making the best tequila is. See in detail the specifics of each flavor we craft and discover which was made for you. From the Gonzalez Family’s farm to your glass, take a look at what it takes to be a “Farm to Glass” Tequila.

JIMADOR
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The Process
of Making
Tequila
What's in my glass?
Take a look at our process
How agave is grown and harvested
What makes the difference?
IT TAKES 100% AGAVE
TO MAKE TEQUILA.
IT TAKES A FAMILY TO
MAKE THE BEST TEQUILA
Take a look.
Then take a drink.

PLANTING

The 3 Amigos Team harvests the shoots (baby agave) from mature agave plants. We pull these shoots around 6- 10 months and are planted soon after. Before the shoots are planted they are left unrooted for a week, if the agave looks weak then the plant will not be used. Growing our own agave, we ensure that the plant will withstand the conditions of the region it grows in. The agave is maintained organically without the use of harmful chemicals like pesticides and herbicides. These little shoots have a long way to go, approximately 5-7 years! These shoots will eventually grow up to 200 lbs in size.

These little shoots have a long way to go, approximately

5-7 years!

MAINTAINING

We maintain our fields with machinery, hand labor, and livestock. To start we manage the field with machinery. We avoid putting the cattle in the fields early because they can pull the agave out. Once the agave is too big for a machine to go in the field then it maintained by hand labor and livestock. Sheep and livestock that eat the grasses that grow around the agave. The agave has very pointed ends of the leaves, so when the animals can not reach the base of the agave, we step in and clean it up. By working together with nature we are creating an organic and environmentally safe ecosystem.

By working together with nature we are creating an organic and environmentally safe ecosystem.

“JIMA” – HARVESTING

Before our agave is harvested, it is checked for its ripeness by inspecting its maturity and sugar content. The most common way to check for maturity is to look at the “heart” of the agave plant. 

If the heart of the agave swells and starts to turn a light yellow, this is indication that the sugars are present in the agave and it is time to harvest. If the heart is still green we leave the agave in the field, untouched until it is ready.

This practice is not common because most agave is contracted out and usually not owned by the producer.


The primary job of the jimador is to shave off all the leaves off the agave correctly.

When the agave is shaved from it’s leaves, it is referred to as a pina, aka pineapple (not related). The more leave that is present in the pina the more bitter the tequila can taste.

This is one of the most crucial points of the process of tequila, because if your agave is not harvested correctly you will have an inferior product. 

If the heart of the agave swells and starts to turn a light yellow, this is indication that the sugars are present in the agave and it is time to harvest.

COOKING

Before our fermentation process, the pinas (heart of agave) are cooked to convert the starches into fermentable sugars. The piñas are put in the cookers in a special form to ensure that they are all cooked evenly through the process. Before the piñas are cooked, the oven is filled to the top, and after they are cooked they shrink to about half the capacity of the cooker. The cooking process takes approximatley 12 hours, and then once they are done the piñas are crushed in order to release the juices/sugars that will be fermented.

The piñas are put in the cookers in a special form to ensure that they are all cooked evenly through the process.

FERMENTATION

After the agaves are cooked, they are then juiced mechanically. The juice is then transferred to the fermentation tanks. 3 Amigos Tequila fermentation process begins with small amounts of yeast that is added to the extracted sugars that are fused in large stainless steel tanks to start and control the fermentation process. During the 72 hour period the sugars are converted into alcohol.

During the 72 hour period the sugars are converted into alcohol.

DISTILLATION

Our tequila is distilled twice to ensure the purest final product. Before the first distillation the cabeza (head) and cola (tail) are removed and discarded, reserving the Corazon (heart) which is the purest part of the plant. Our first distillation takes approximately 2 hours, separating the alcohol and impurities. The second distillation takes approximately 5 hours, purifying the alcohol and is followed by a filtering process elevating the alcohol content, and ensuring the quality and consistency of our product. 

Our tequila is distilled twice to ensure the purest final product.

3 Amigos Tequila Blanco is where it all starts. Most tequila connoisseurs will prefer a less expensive Blanco versus a rested and/or aged tequila, because it is tequila in it’s purest form. Remember, if your Blanco is not of good quality, it will show with your reposado and anejo tequila.

Reposado translates to “Rested”

Reposado classification is tequila that is rested in aging barrels for a minimum of 2 months,

and a maximum of up to 11 months.

3 Amigos Tequila Reposado is rested for 11 months in charred white oak barrels.

Añejo translates to “Aged”

For tequila to be classified as Añejo, the Blanco tequila must be aged for at least one year. The maximum amount of time that an Añejo can be aged is 3 years. 3 Amigos Tequila Añejo is aged in White American Charred Oak barrels for two years.

Ramona’s Reserve is made with the double gold winning 3 Amigos Añejo as the base.

Sweetened with the same agave that the family produces, 

and spices that truly compliment the whole experience of this special tequila liqueur.

Extra Añejo translates to “Extra Aged”

The classification to be an Extra Añejo is aging Blanco Tequila for a minimum of 3 years in aging barrels. The industry standard is usually 5 years.

3 Amigos Tequila Extra Añejo is aged for 8 years in white American charred oak.

Process

Planting – 0-6 Months into the process timeline

Planting – 0-6 Months into the process timeline

The 3 Amigos Team harvests the shoots (baby agave) from mature agave plants. We pull these shoots around 6- 10 months and are planted soon after. Before the shoots are planted they are left..Read More!

Maintaining – 6 Months-7 Years into the process timeline

Maintaining – 6 Months-7 Years into the process timeline

We maintain our fields with machinery, hand labor, and livestock. To start we manage the field with machinery. We avoid putting the cattle in the fields early because they can pull the..Read More!

“Jima” – Harvesting – 7 Years into the process timeline

“Jima” – Harvesting – 7 Years into the process timeline

“La Jima” – The Harvest Before our agave is harvested, it is checked for its ripeness by inspecting its maturity and sugar content. The most common way to check for maturity..Read More!

Cooking – 7 Years into the process timeline

Cooking – 7 Years into the process timeline

Before our fermentation process, the pinas (heart of agave) are cooked to convert the starches into fermentable sugars. The piñas are put in the cookers in a special form to ensure that..Read More!

Fermentation – 7 Years into the process timeline

Fermentation – 7 Years into the process timeline

Fermentation is the process in which yeast breaks down sugar into alcohol and carbon dioxide. … Carbon dioxide gas bubbles out of the fermenting solution into the air leaving a mixture..Read More!

Distillation – 7 Years into the process timeline

Distillation – 7 Years into the process timeline

Our tequila is distilled twice to ensure the purest final product. Before the first distillation the cabeza (head) and cola (tail) are removed and discarded, reserving the Corazon (heart) which is..Read More!

Blanco – 7 Years & 1 Month into the process timeline

Blanco – 7 Years & 1 Month into the process timeline

Tequila in it’s purest form. 3 Amigos Tequila Blanco is where it all starts. Most tequila connoisseurs will prefer a less expensive Blanco versus a rested and/or aged tequila, because it..Read More!

Reposado – 8 Years into the process timeline

Reposado – 8 Years into the process timeline

Reposado translates to “Rested” Reposado classification is tequila that is rested in aging barrels for a minimum of 2 months, and a maximum of up to 11 months. 3 Amigos Tequila Reposado..Read More!

Anejo – 9 Years & 1 Month into the Process Timeline

Anejo – 9 Years & 1 Month into the Process Timeline

Añejo translates to “Aged” For tequila to be classified as Añejo, the Blanco tequila must be aged for at least one year. The maximum amount of time that an Añejo can..Read More!

Ramonas Reserve – 9 Years & 1 Month into the Process Timeline

Ramonas Reserve – 9 Years & 1 Month into the Process Timeline

Ramona’s Reserve is made with the double gold winning 3 Amigos Añejo as the base. Sweetened with the same agave that the family produces, and spices that truly compliment the whole experience..Read More!

Extra Anejo – 15 Years & 1 Month into the process Timeline

extra anejo

Extra Añejo translates to “Extra Aged” The classification to be an Extra Añejo is aging Blanco Tequila for a minimum of 3 years in aging barrels. The industry standard is usually..Read More!

What a process! How about a drink?

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